5.3 Co-Designing Strategies for a Sustainable Future: Wonderful Copenhagen

The case study allows you to get an in-depth understanding of how innovation can foster rapid adaption to dynamic situations with design thinking and collaboration.

During this keynote, Runa Sabroe from Wonderful Copenhagen shares how they collaborated with the cultural sector to overcome the adversities of the pandemic by developing innovative solutions through design thinking for the challenges faced.

Designing Creative Solutions through Innovation & Collaboration

During this keynote, Runa Sabroe from Wonderful Copenhagen shares how they collaborated with the cultural sector to overcome the adversities of the pandemic by developing innovative solutions through design thinking for the challenges faced.

Main Takeaways:

  1. Innovation is all about being anti-fragile - handling the dynamic situations to be competent
  2. Data and insights play a huge role in understanding consumers' perceptions and shaping solutions to address the challenges
  3. Innovation means creatively exploring problems, generating alternative scenarios, and enacting new prototypes accordingly.

While sharing the insights into the strategy, Runa says the change is so dramatic and dynamic that it requires the ability to adapt to change with innovative solutions and creativity. The message for the cultural institutions and the tourism industry is not only to survive but get better. The changing scenario should be considered as competence, and the tourism sector should adapt and innovate to be prepared for the future.

Runa claims, "the art of innovation is to work design driven" with a focus on:

  1. Exploring the problem from the users perspective
  2. Generating the alternative scenarios fast
  3. Enacting new practices through prototype

This is a model which helps them to explore the change and understand the problems by coming up-close with the daily problems of visitors.

The Role of Data and Insights

The rapidly changing data and insights about travelers' preferences and consumer behavior of the cultural visitor. It is essential to understand the travellers' perceptions and needs while visiting a destination and develop solutions that can support travellers' needs.

For Wonderful Copenhagen, they decided to ask 4,500 international guests what is most important in investing in cultural institutions. Here are the key findings:

  1. 55% claim that knowing COVID-19 restrictions are upheld. This shows us that taking public health seriously and communicating changes is important.
  2. 44% claim access to outdoor experiences is important. Adaption to change is no longer "nice to have" but critical.
  3. 30% claim that limiting the number of people attending is important. The feeling of risky and unsafe environments is a big concern to address.

This is a model which helps them to explore the change and understand the problems by coming up-close with the daily problems of visitors.

Prototyping and Implementing Solutions

The art of innovation is also about "reconstruction". Working with other cities in Denmark they developed a series of test labs, an initiative to embrace innovation within different prototype environments. They developed thirty solutions for visitors, public and private sectors. They then created rapid prototypes which provided tangible futures that could be developed further.

The National Gallery of Denmark used this process to explore new digital business models. The pandemic showed us the opportunity and necessity to accelerate digitalisation and with that new digital business models. They had a new digital business model, focusing on transitioning the perception of digital as being space for free to low-priced products by transitioning it to digital premium products. With the help of a pricing expert, they increased the price seven times and it in fact sold out in hours. The perception and appreciation for the value were communicated by the price itself and this allowed them to break a perception that everything online must be free.

The next learning was about taking the museum out of the building - allowing the time, space and ultimately target group to be broadened. An initiative born from the pandemic but still here afterward.

Odense used this programme to design experiences for new target groups. They recognised there were no guests from the local areas and so moved from having boat trips with 30-40 guests (tourists) towards an opportunity for time together for families, friends, and colleagues. As such, they shifted focus to speak to a new kind of target group of family, friends, and colleagues which resulted in immediate bookings with a high KPI per sale.

The Science Museum is another prominent example. They had the same problem as the National Gallery where they needed to take the experience to the outside of the museum. They offered a "Mars from Home" experience, with a bus and staff from the museum delivering the experience, moving it from a tangible experience in the museum to a starting point for time together with friends.

During this keynote, Runa Sabroe from Wonderful Copenhagen shares how they collaborated with the cultural sector to overcome the adversities of the pandemic by developing innovative solutions through design thinking for the challenges faced.

Designing Creative Solutions through Innovation & Collaboration

During this keynote, Runa Sabroe from Wonderful Copenhagen shares how they collaborated with the cultural sector to overcome the adversities of the pandemic by developing innovative solutions through design thinking for the challenges faced.

Main Takeaways:

  1. Innovation is all about being anti-fragile - handling the dynamic situations to be competent
  2. Data and insights play a huge role in understanding consumers' perceptions and shaping solutions to address the challenges
  3. Innovation means creatively exploring problems, generating alternative scenarios, and enacting new prototypes accordingly.

While sharing the insights into the strategy, Runa says the change is so dramatic and dynamic that it requires the ability to adapt to change with innovative solutions and creativity. The message for the cultural institutions and the tourism industry is not only to survive but get better. The changing scenario should be considered as competence, and the tourism sector should adapt and innovate to be prepared for the future.

Runa claims, "the art of innovation is to work design driven" with a focus on:

  1. Exploring the problem from the users perspective
  2. Generating the alternative scenarios fast
  3. Enacting new practices through prototype

This is a model which helps them to explore the change and understand the problems by coming up-close with the daily problems of visitors.

The Role of Data and Insights

The rapidly changing data and insights about travelers' preferences and consumer behavior of the cultural visitor. It is essential to understand the travellers' perceptions and needs while visiting a destination and develop solutions that can support travellers' needs.

For Wonderful Copenhagen, they decided to ask 4,500 international guests what is most important in investing in cultural institutions. Here are the key findings:

  1. 55% claim that knowing COVID-19 restrictions are upheld. This shows us that taking public health seriously and communicating changes is important.
  2. 44% claim access to outdoor experiences is important. Adaption to change is no longer "nice to have" but critical.
  3. 30% claim that limiting the number of people attending is important. The feeling of risky and unsafe environments is a big concern to address.

This is a model which helps them to explore the change and understand the problems by coming up-close with the daily problems of visitors.

Prototyping and Implementing Solutions

The art of innovation is also about "reconstruction". Working with other cities in Denmark they developed a series of test labs, an initiative to embrace innovation within different prototype environments. They developed thirty solutions for visitors, public and private sectors. They then created rapid prototypes which provided tangible futures that could be developed further.

The National Gallery of Denmark used this process to explore new digital business models. The pandemic showed us the opportunity and necessity to accelerate digitalisation and with that new digital business models. They had a new digital business model, focusing on transitioning the perception of digital as being space for free to low-priced products by transitioning it to digital premium products. With the help of a pricing expert, they increased the price seven times and it in fact sold out in hours. The perception and appreciation for the value were communicated by the price itself and this allowed them to break a perception that everything online must be free.

The next learning was about taking the museum out of the building - allowing the time, space and ultimately target group to be broadened. An initiative born from the pandemic but still here afterward.

Odense used this programme to design experiences for new target groups. They recognised there were no guests from the local areas and so moved from having boat trips with 30-40 guests (tourists) towards an opportunity for time together for families, friends, and colleagues. As such, they shifted focus to speak to a new kind of target group of family, friends, and colleagues which resulted in immediate bookings with a high KPI per sale.

The Science Museum is another prominent example. They had the same problem as the National Gallery where they needed to take the experience to the outside of the museum. They offered a "Mars from Home" experience, with a bus and staff from the museum delivering the experience, moving it from a tangible experience in the museum to a starting point for time together with friends.